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20121128
20121206
STATION
KQEH (PBS) 13
LANGUAGE
English 13
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
they will tend to outperform in a risk-on environment in a cyclical upturn. >> reporter: now, the other scenario: >> in an environment where we go off the fiscal cliff and we see continued problems on the debt side for the u.s., i think the gold price outperforms the white metals. >> reporter: gold's price will also depend on whether central banks continue to diversify their holdings into gold, and whether they implement more quantitative easing to boost growth. the outlook for platinum is a little more complicated. there have been major supply disruptions due to labor unrest in south africa, which produces nearly all of the world's platinum. it also depends on demand. >> europe is a key part of the platinum demand picture. if europe can recover, certainly that's going to bode well for platinum demand. if the price trades higher, it may affect some of the price- sensitive sectors like jewelry, like chinese jewelry demand. >> reporter: of course, many investors only buy metals for investment reasons. currently, there's over $150 billion invested in gold exchange-traded funds, an all- time high. e
. >> looking to the new year, the business environment, consumer sentiment, how are things shaping up for ford? >> well, right now it looks like it's going to continue to expand. both in gdp and the industry. based especially on the second half of this year. but again, it is all going to be very dependent on what the economy does and what we do especially in the united states to create an environment where the consumer feels confident and they can purchase these decisions opinions what about europe kux turn those losses into profits. >> we have announced our plan for europe which is similar to what we did in the united states. we will bring more vehicles in to people wanting value and restructuring the operations to get back to profitability but a very, very tough situation in europe economically. >> susie: you said will you step down as c.e.o. in 2014. what do you want to accomplish before you hand over the keys of ford. >> i want to complete the development of this family of vehicles, both for ford and lincoln that are absolutely best in class. and that people really love them and they reall
to extract the region's natural gas, while preserving its environment. i reported from there earlier this year. the banks of the white river in eastern utah are perfectly quiet, in a way it's sometimes hard to find in a world of seven billion people-- just the sounds of gently flowing water, a hint of a breeze, the occasional bird. the gorgeous vistas and rare solitude sit on public land thousands of feet above a bonanza trapped deep in the earth. from high above, it's easy to see how the gas industry has changed the landscape, with gas wells by the thousands altering the fragile desert ecosystem. utah environmentalists say the view from the air and from the canyon floor illustrate why they want these public lands protected. >> you know, what families find when they come here, what outfitters, what americans come to experience this place, it's the quiet, it's the solitude, it's that you don't have the sight and sounds of human development around you. it's a place where people can come and restore themselves. there are more cliffs on this side. and that's an area where there really ar
on the table could you imagine that breaking through the current political environment. >> i think basically now, gwen, there are three sticking points. one is the amount of revenue and the sources of revenue. the second is the amount of spending cuts and how much of that will come from the entitlement programs particularly health. the last sticking point is what do we do about this debt limit that we've come up against all the time that puts our credit in danger. >> ifill: the president has said the debt limit should be, at least in his opening statement, that the debt limit debate should be set aside and that nothing can be done unless the taxes are cut... are raised for the wealthy. is that part of a solution that you can see working for what it is everybody is trying to get to here? >> look, gwen, i'm not a bit worried that it appears on the surface that secretary geithner ton the speaker didn't make any progress last week. that's just a theater you go through. geithner made his first offer. the republicans rejected it. no surprise. i'm sure that this offer that the speaker has made toda
market a little more friendly, and mak making the business environment more friendly. i think a large part of it, and a big part of it is abandoning the austerity. at least until they're able to return to economic growth and slowly start piecing it in. >> susie: let me ask you about this, wall street has been so focused on the fiscal cliff situation, how important are these issues in europe for american investors? >> i think the issues in europe are important because they've been a pain in most investors' sides for the past couple of years. if you think about the end game in europe, which probably includes some type of fiscal integration, we realize it is going to take a long time. i believe that what you are seeing in europe is creating some volatility in the markets over the next couple of years to come. however, the last action from the european central bank was a game changer. in coming in and opening up the o.n.t n.t. program bought the sovereigns a little more time to work through their issues. i think the market is going to weigh in on investors' minds over the years to come. >
and safety to the environment to taxation. in alec task forces, elected state officials and corporate representatives close the doors to press and public, and together approve the bills that will be sent out to america. but americans have no idea they come from alec, unless someone like a mark pocan exposes it. >> when i went down to new orleans, to the alec convention last august, i remember going to a workshop and hearing a little bit about a bill they did in florida and some other states. and there was a proposal to provide special-needs scholarships. and lo and behold all of a sudden i come back to wisconsin, and what gets introduced? get ready. i know you're going to have a shocked look on your face. a bill to do just that. >> 26 alec members in the wisconsin legislature sponsored that special-needs bill, but the real sponsor was alec. pocan knew because the bill bore a striking resemblance to alec's model. have a look. but pocan isn't only concerned that alec sneaks bills into the state legislature. the intent behind the bills troubles him too. >> some of their legislation sound
to be able to be done, especially in this environment, to be honest. >> suarez: representative, you just heard the senator lay out why time is of the essence. is time also of the essence in a political sense? do you have to do this in calendar 13 before the congress gets caught up in the midterms for 2014? >> look, tomorrow, the next session, the next month, the next term, those aren't words. it's now. the latino community spoke clearly and eloquently and forcefully and in a unified fashion across this nation. and i say to my colleagues in the republican party it is time that we listen to the electorate. and they spoke very clearly. look, a couple of things just very quickly: everyday we deport a thousand people. that's 30,000 a month. let me just make it clear: tens of thousands of people are going to be deported this year who have american citizen children. they can't wait for piecemeal. we have a stem industry that needs workers today. think about all this talk about uncertainty and uncertainty and how that has an impact, a negative impact on our economy. let's take the uncertainty aw
, they face a radically changed social media environment where youtube videos spread virally across the internet. >> a regular flu shot gone horribly wrong. >> these people were much more likely to believe something they had seen on youtube than the centers for disease control and the fda. that's a little frightening. >> tonight, frontline reports on the science and politics of the bitter "vaccine war." >> frontline is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you.and by the corporatir public broadcasting. major funding is provided by the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant, and peaceful world. and by reva and david logan, committed to investigative journalism as the guardian of the public interest. additional funding is provided by the park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. and by the frontline journalism fund. with grants from scott nathan and laura debonis, and the hagler family. >> what a cute little face. aww, here we come. it's a girl! >> yeah! >>
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)